MEXICO
FACTS
Medical personnel: 693
Cumulative: 733
Mission status: Active
AGREEMENTS
MOST RECENT AGREEMENT
Medical Collaboration Agreement
DURATION: Not determined
BEGAN: 2020
AGREEMENT SIGNER:
Mexico’s Health Institute for Wellbeing and Institute for Social
Security and Services for State
Workers, and Mexico City’s health
and administrative finances
ministries
PREVIOUS AGREEMENTS
Specific collaboration agreement
(1985)
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Geographic areas: Mexico City
and Veracruz
Health areas: Comprehensive
internal medicine, biomedicine,
internal and critical medicine,
epidemiology, and nursing
Contracts obtained: NO
Agreement obtained: NO
Laws available: NO
Current figures:
• Active personnel: 693
• Defections: 15
• Did not return to Cuba: 15
• Prohibited from returning to
Cuba: 15
Media available: Yes
Official data available: Yes
Violations documented: Yes
Cases before UN/ICC: Yes
Cases in courts: NO
Most relevant violations:
Confiscation of passports,
mandatory housing assignment,
prohibition of staying overnight
somewhere other than assigned
housing without permission,
imposition of curfew, prohibition on
having social relations with
nationals without authorization,
restrictions on movement within the
country, and monitoring by
supervisors and colleagues.

SUMMARY

Cuba’s medical collaboration with Mexico began in 1985 when, following an earthquake, Cuba sent a medical brigade of 40 workers and 13 tons of various materials. Since then, the Cuban government has offered Mexico medical and technical services. In 2017, the two governments signed medical cooperation agreements including in the areas of research and exchange of medicines and treatments. From April to May 2020, 585 Cuban medical personnel arrived in Mexico City and 108 in Veracruz to assist the response to Covid-19, through agreements with local governments. However, the number could be higher, as a source in the capital’s Economic Development Secretariat (SEDECO) has said that authorities count around 800 Cuban doctors who are staying in Mexico City. The assistance of the medical workers is costing the Mexican government 6,255,792 USD, which includes salaries but also training, advising and joint research efforts. Of the average $10,700 USD the Mexican government pays for each of the 585 Cuban medical worker that provides services in the nation’s capital, Havana pays them only $660 USD for three months ($220 USD per month). Meanwhile, housing for the workers has been provided by Mexican hotel establishments that have made “donations” to support the fight against the pandemic. Since April, at least 15 Cuban medical workers have already defected from this mission.

DOCUMENTED CASES

Anonymous: None
Not anonymous: None
Public (media): 2 Link to media reports
Findings from cases: In addition to violations stemming from Resolution 168 and other
applicable Cuban laws, the testimonies of two female medical workers allege confiscation
of passports, mandatory housing assignment, prohibition of staying overnight somewhere
other than assigned housing without permission, imposition of curfew, prohibition on
having social relations with nationals without authorization, restrictions on movement
within the country, and monitoring by supervisors and colleagues.

NAMES OF CHIEFS OF MISSIONS

Orlando, Chief of Mission in Mexico City (last name remains unknown)

RELEVANT NEWS ARTICLES AND OTHER ITEMS

EnglishSpanish